Sunnyside Police Thank Citizens For Aid In Multiple Arrests

It’s not often that press releases I receive get posted here, however, I wish to add my personal thanks to citizens aiding the police in catching bad guys. We are all safer when we work together to protect our neighborhoods.

September 16, 2014

To: Press Release

From: Cmdr. S. Bailey, Operations Division

Subject:  Violent offenders arrested in Sunnyside on outstanding warrants.

On the evening of September 18, 2014 Christian Ramirez 21 YOA was arrested in the area of Rouse Road within the City of Sunnyside on an active arrest warrant for 1st Degree Assault in connection to a stabbing case in the Prosser area of Benton County.  Ramirez was arrested by the Sunnyside Police Department then turned over to Deputies from Benton County Sheriff’s Office.

On September 19, 2014, approximately 0800 hours, Fidel Gonzalez-Molina 20YOA was arrested on a traffic stop for an outstanding warrant for 1st Degree Robbery and 2nd Degree Assault near the intersection of Sheller and Kriner roads in Sunnyside.  A passenger in the vehicle, Omar Cuevas 19 YOA was also arrested on an outstanding warrant.  Both are documented gang members.

The arrests stem from concerned citizens providing tips to the whereabouts of the wanted subjects.  The Sunnyside Police Department would like to extend our thanks to those citizens who provided information leading to the arrests and urge citizens to continue to partner with local law enforcement agencies in an effort to build safer communities.

Anyone with information regarding wanted persons in Sunnyside is urged to contact the police department at 509-836-6200.

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Get to Know King David

King David_225_350_Book.1268.cover

Nancy I. Sanders pens a series of books aimed at kids called “Get to Know…,” with this latest book focusing on the Biblical King David.  It is recommended by the publisher primarily for ages 6-10, but older readers seeking a summary of David’s life will also find it useful.  Over the course of 100 pages, the book charts its course; tracking David from an unknown shepherd boy, his famous confrontation with a giant, rule over the kingdom, preparations for the temple, and a little bit of prophetic vison of the coming Messiah.

The book is divided into 12 chapters, which are also chopped up with full color pictures and illustrations, as well as bubbles filled with factoids from history and the Bible.  This keeps younger readers more engaged, as each page turn is not as likely to lose their attention.  It also helps define words that early readers may stumble over.

Having read this book through, I am now reading it with my own children.  I can recommend this for both family time, and also for devotional or Sunday School environments.  When reading at home, I am typically taking one chapter at a time.  This serves as a conversation starter as we discuss how it compares to the Bible itself.  For instance, my nine year old son pointed out that the author did not mention the part where David cuts Goliath’s head off.  Grisly details like this are much more interesting for boys, but if this is a concern for parents, please know the author does not write in a way that might disturb little kids or squeamish adults.

For its interesting take on a key figure of the Bible, this book gets five stars.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

 

Wenatchee Daily World|Sunnyside Has Public Rest Room

Note: On Friday, March 5, 1909, the Wenatchee Daily World reported this story. An image of this newspaper page is available through the Library of Congress, which in turn received the image from the Washington State Library in Olympia. The original online source for this blog post is here. Wenatchee women are talking of the very crying need for such public conveniences to this very day; and can let history be their guide.

WOMEN OF THE CITY ESTABLISHED ROOM FOR CONVENIENCE OF PEOPLE COMING IN FROM THE COUNTRY.

Sunnyside has a public convenience that Wenatchee women have often talked of as being a very crying need and there have been spasmodic attempts made to establish a public rest room here for women, but so far there has been nothing decisive done.

Sunnyside is a small town of about 1200 inhabitants in the fertile valley of Yakima. This valley is settled quite thickly, and while there are many large ranches, the majority are small ranches—twenty, forty or eighty acres and are tributary to this city, so a great many people drive here to trade. If it happens to be windy or dusty the visitors present a dishevelled and often a demoralized appearance and would like some convenient room where they could retouch their toilet and restore that harmonious and chic completeness so dear to both men and women.

The necessity existed and a few energetic women saw it and determined to do something, but they had not a penny to start with; anyway, they started. The Public Rest Room club sprang into existence. There are a president, secretary and treasurer and an executive board. The president is a hustling, capable woman. A room in the business portion of Sunnyside was rented. The first month’s rent was donated to offset the expense of putting the room in order; it was papered and made as cozy as possible. Tables, stoves, floor coverings, rockers and other chairs, couch and other furniture and fixings were donated or loaned, many of them not entirely new. The telephone was also donated. Bread, pies and cake were freely given for sale and a present of about 50 potatoes sacks, which were sold at 5 cents each. So Sunnyside had a place where men, women and children could come in and enjoy a warm fire, a rocking chair, papers, books and magazines. There is no charge for any of these comforts, but a box for freewill offerings stands upon the table.

Men know where to find theirwives when they are through shopping, and friends meet one another there.

The club is not a money-making scheme, as no one gets a cent but the matron. There is also a library of about 500 books, including the latest and best. The merchants contribute monthly about 25 cents and upwards, which more than pays the rent, and any surplus is used to add another comfort to the rooms. During the one year of its life about 4000 visits were paid to the rest room, and the merchants look upon it as a good business investment.

The new quarters have four rooms —library, dining room, kitchen and a room for ladles and babies.

You Can’t Tame God

Yawning at Tigers_225_350_Book.1212.cover

 

Drew Dyck departs from editing and writing about ministry, turning instead to writing about God in this thought provoking work.  “Yawning At Tigers,” subtitled “You Can’t Tame God So Stop Trying” takes on thoughts and actions some adopt toward God.  The actions that Dyck wishes to depart from are from those that believe they have the Almighty all figured out.

How can a person predict the actions of one who surpasses all knowledge and understanding?  The author attempts to approach our relationship with the Lord by reminding readers that He is the all powerful creator and judge of mankind.  Many in modern ministry stress how much God loves us, which is true, but seem to fall short of reminding us of his dangerous power too.

Dyck speaks about going to the zoo where the most popular exhibits include dangerous animals like lions, tigers, and bears.  He says they are of the most interest to visitors because they are powerful, and in different circumstances a potential threat to us.  He views God in some similar ways, and explores what that means for us as we navigate our own faith journey.

Some might be offended by the author’s use of a tiger as a metaphor for God, but he makes it work.  The book includes discussion questions for each of the twelve chapters at the end of the book.  This makes it suitable for small groups, but it makes for a good individual read also.

This book gets four stars out of five.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

What Works, Common Sense from Cal Thomas

What Works

Common Sense Solutions for a Stronger America

by Cal Thomas

What Works_240_360_Book.1158.cover

Tagline: It’s Groundhog Day in Washington. This is a metaphor Cal Thomas uses at the beginning and end of his book, where he promotes a historical look at what works for making America great.  Thomas compares the continually low respect Congress has as an institution to the movie “Groundhog Day,” which features Bill Murray’s character living the same day over and over again.

With low expectations, (the book has a foreword by Sean Hannity) I began reading what I thought would be a thorough round of bashing Democrats, but was surprised by how the author addressed the problems facing America and the world.  Thomas goes into extensive detail, sharing his personal Christian religious views, and illustrating how they are in congruence with those of traditional Jewish teachings as well.  Readers do well to recognize he is talking about basic values that reinforce respect of others and their property.

While Thomas himself is unapologetically evangelical, he is not seeking to make religious converts through this book, per se.  It is more of an observation that the further American society deviates from traditional values, the lower the standard of living becomes, the more people are placed in jail, and the more single mothers struggle to make ends meet each month.

With most Americans saying the country is moving in the wrong direction, with more Americans out of the labor force than ever before, and the ranks of food stamp recipients at record levels, readers will find new ways of solving problems by looking at common sense solutions that have a historical record of success.

This book gets five stars.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Will Winter be Yakima County Sheriff?

Brian Winter, Lieutenant at Yakima County Sheriff's Office, speaks about his running for the top law enforcement position in the county.

Brian Winter, Lieutenant at Yakima County Sheriff’s Office, speaks about his running for the top law enforcement position in the county.

This past Friday, Brian Winter came to town as one of four candidates, for various county elected positions.  The gathering was orchestrated by the Sunnyside Republican Club.

Winter has a long career in law enforcement, working initially with Union Gap Police Department, then joining the Yakima County Sheriff’s Office.  In addition to law enforcement experience, he also served in the Marine Corps reserve.  In fact, he said he was deployed for Desert Storm in 1991 when the Sheriff’s Office first called to offer him a position.  Fortunately, they were willing to wait for him to return, and he joined them shortly thereafter.

Working his way up through the ranks in both the Sheriff’s Office, and the Marine Corps, Winter now serves as the only Lieutenant at the Yakima County Sheriff’s Office.  He commands three Patrol Precincts, and says he does not want anyone to be in this position in the future.  If elected, he promises to reorganize the office, having at least two lieutenant positions: one for the upper valley, and one for the lower valley.

Meanwhile, Winter continued serving in the Marines, being deployed to Iraq a second time in 2004, where he supervised service members in the battle for Fallujah.  He retired from the Marine Corps in 2011 as a Lieutenant Colonel with 30 years of service.

While in the Sheriff’s Office, Winter says he applied for grants to get hard armor vests for many police departments in the county.  Many of these grants did not benefit the Sheriff’s Office directly, but he felt obligated to help local police gain valuable assets for safety.  The last such grant he obtained was for the Sunnyside Police Department.

With his varied background and experience, Winter feels confident about his ability to both administer the office and manage budgets as Sheriff.

He and his wife Tammy have been married for 25 years.

Winter is one of six Republican candidates for Sheriff. (No Democrats are running for the position.)  He joked that it seemed like someone new was filing for the position everyday, and said one candidate has zero law enforcement experience.

Will Winter be the next Yakima County Sheriff?  He is working hard to do so, but so is the competition.  Winter presents a well rounded choice, and makes no bones about his belief that he is the best choice on the ballot this year.

Two County Clerk Candidates Speak to Republican Club

Janelle Riddle and Jose Trevino are two of the candidates for Yakima County Clerk.  They both made appearances at this week’s meeting of the Sunnyside Republican Club.

Janelle Riddle speaking to the Sunnyside Republican Club about her bid to become Yakima County Clerk.

Janelle Riddle speaking to the Sunnyside Republican Club about her bid to become Yakima County Clerk.

Riddle and her husband have been operating a family excavation business for over 30 years.  She points out that she also has experience in the clerk’s office; working as a clerk to a judge, a legal secretary, and as a supervisor in the clerk’s office.

She says she is the only candidate running that can show employees what they need to be doing; and that some areas of the office need to gain efficiencies through increased training of personnel.

Jose Trevino also takes a turn explaining why he is seeking the County Clerk position.

Jose Trevino also takes a turn explaining why he is seeking the County Clerk position.

Jose Trevino tells the club he is a 40 year resident of the valley, and a graduate of Sunnyside High School.  He now lives in Granger, where he serves as a member of the city council.  In the past, he served 16 years as a police officer and police sergeant.  He now works for the state’s Department of Labor and Industries as a fraud investigator.

Trevino wants to streamline programs and operations.  As an example, he cited problems the county faces with jury selection and attendance; a court function handled by the County Clerk’s office.  He believes his background can help him improve coordination with judges, the court coordinator and administrator, and even the auditor’s office.

When asked about the perception of a backlog of cases in the Yakima County Courthouse, and what can be done about it, both candidates said the responsibility for that rests primarily with the lawyers and judges who schedule cases in court.  However, both clerk candidates said they can help matters by running an efficient supporting operation.

 

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